Outlines of Imperfect and Disordered Mental Action

Front Cover
Harper, 1840 - Mental efficiency - 399 pages
 

Contents

Of popular adaptation combined with philosophical
63
Of the Actual Process in cases of Sensation
69
Of Disordered Sensations and Perceptions connected
75
42
77
Illustrations of the foregoing Views in connexion with
82
45
84
The Disordered auditory Sensations of the poet Cow
91
Other cases illustrative of Disordered Sensations
97
Illustrations of the Subject from the use of Opium
104
CHAPTER VI
109
Of the less permanent Excited Conceptions of Sight
111
Of disordered Conceptions combined with a disor
117
CHAPTER VII
123
Second Cause of Spectral Illusions or Apparitions
129
74
133
Of Ghosts and other Spectral Appearances
135
79
139
CHAPTER VIII
142
Further Illustrations of this Topic
149
CHAPTER IX
157
Cases of sudden failure of the Attention
163
CHAPTER X
169
Apparent reality of Dreams 2d cause
175
DISORDERED ACTION OF THE INTERNAL INTEL
193
Disordered mental action in connexion with Time
200
CHAPTER II
206
CHAPTER III
214
Of disordered Judgment in connexion with facility
220
Of natural or congenital Moral Derangement
221
Section
225
Of temporary excitement of the associating Principle
233
Of loss of Memory in relation to particular Subjects
241
Of failure of Reasoning from the want of Ideas
248
Of readiness of Reasoning in the partially Insane
254
Disorder of the Imagination as connected with Asso
260
Section Page 154 Disorder of the Imagination as connected with the Sensibilities
262
Other illustrations of the same subject
263
Of inordinate Imagination the opposite of misanthrop ical
265
CHAPTER VIII
267
Of the degree of intellectual power possessed in Idiocy
268
Of the natural and moral sensibilities in Idiocy
269
Of certain marked or peculiar aspects of Idiocy
270
Further notices on the disorder of the Appetites
286
CHAPTER II
288
Section Page v THE DESIRE OF ESTEEM
289
Disordered action of the principle of Selfpreservation 289 173 Other disordered forms of the Selfpreservative princi ple
291
Explanation of the abovementioned cases
292
Further remarks on this subject
294
11 PROPENSITY TO ACQUIRE OR ACQUISITIVENESS
296
177
297
General view of Somnambulism
303
Of this form of Insanity in connexion with particular
309
Of Sympathetic Imitation in large multitudes
315
Additional and striking facts on this subject
321
The desire of Esteem susceptible of a disordered action
328
Further explanatory remarks on this subject
329
Incidents illustrative of this form of Alienation
330
Other instances still further illustrative of the subject
331
CHAPTER VII
332
True idea of Alienation or Insanity of the Sensibilities
333
The irregular action of the Social principle exists in two forms
334
Further remarks on the disordered action of the Social propensity
336
Of the disease founded on the Social propensity termed Nostalgia
338
Disordered action of the principle of Veracity
339
CHAPTER VIII
341
Of sudden and strong impulses of Mind
343
Insanity of the Affections or Passions
345
Of the mental disease termed Hypochondriasis
346
Of other forms of Hypochondriasis
347
Of intermissions of Hypochondriasis and of its reme dies
349
Further remarks on the remedies of Hypochondriasis
350
Disordered action of the passion of Fear
351
Other illustrations of the disordered action of this pas sion
353
Perversions of the Benevolent Affection
354
Other cases of perverted Benevolent Affections
355
CHAPTER IX
356
ordered Conscience
358
Further illustrations of congenital Moral Derangement
360
Of Association in connexion with the Appetites
366
Casual Association in connexion with objects
372
DISORDERED ACTION OF THE WILL
379
IMBECILITY OF THE WILL
385
Further remarks on imbecility of Will
388
Additional illustration of the preceding view
394

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Popular passages

Page 228 - ... of a man of quick parts; by the other many a dunderpate, like the owl, the stupidest of birds, comes to be considered the very type of wisdom.
Page 112 - The sooty films that play upon the bars Pendulous, and foreboding in the view Of superstition, prophesying still, Though still deceived, some stranger's near approach.
Page 329 - Search then the ruling passion : there, alone, The wild are constant, and the cunning known ; The fool consistent, and the false sincere ; Priests, princes, women, no dissemblers here. This clue once found, unravels all the rest, The prospect clears, and Wharton stands confest.
Page 105 - but not before last night. I was walking alone in my garden, there was great stillness among the branches and flowers and more than common sweetness in the air ; I heard a low and pleasant sound, and I knew not whence it came. At last I saw the broad leaf of a flower move, and underneath I saw a procession of creatures of the size and colour of green and gray grasshoppers, bearing a body laid out on a rose leaf, which they buried with songs, and then disappeared. It was a fairy funeral.
Page 314 - When we see a stroke aimed and just ready to fall upon the leg or arm of another person we naturally shrink and draw back our own leg or our own arm...
Page 131 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind; a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
Page 278 - Then let him pass, a blessing on his head! And, long as he can wander, let him breathe The freshness of the valleys; let his blood Struggle with frosty air and...
Page 69 - cannot see the satellites of Jupiter but by a telescope. Does he conclude from this that it is the telescope that sees those stars ? By no means ; such a conclusion would be absurd. It is no less absurd to conclude that it is the eye that sees or the ear that hears. The telescope is an artificial organ of sight, but it sees not. The eye is a natural organ of sight by •which we see ; but the natural organ sees as little as the artificial.
Page 394 - I have, upon innumerable occasions, observed him suddenly stop, and then seem to count his steps with a deep earnestness ; and when he had neglected or gone wrong in this sort of magical movement, I have seen him go back again, put himself in a proper posture to begin the ceremony, and, having gone through it, break from his abstraction, walk briskly on, and join his companion'.
Page 394 - He had another particularity, of which none of his friends even ventured to ask an explanation. It appeared to me some superstitious habit, which he had contracted early, and from which he had never called upon his reason to disentangle him.

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