Interpersonal Diagnosis of Personality: A Functional Theory and Methodology for Personality Evaluation

Voorkant
Wipf and Stock Publishers, 30 jul. 2004 - 538 pagina's
In the decade before he became the highly controversial director of psychedelic drug research at Harvard, Timothy Leary was one of the leading clinical psychologists practicing in the U.S., heading the prestigious
Kaiser Foundation Psychological Research Center in Oakland.

INTERPERSONAL DIAGNOSIS OF PERSONALITY (1957), his first full-length book, summarizes the innovative experimental studies in interpersonal behavior performed by the author and his associates at the Kaiser Foundation and in private practice between 1950 and 1957.
 

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Inhoudsopgave

CHAPTER PAGE
3
Figures
48
VARIABILITY SYSTEMS
59
FIGURE PAGE 1 Continuum of the Sixteen Interpersonal Variables
65
Interpersonal Behavior in Psychotherapy
68
Change in Behavior in Therapy
70
Part II
72
Operational Definition of Five Levels of Personality
81
Percentage of DocileDependent Personalities Level IM
299
Percentage of DocileDependent Personalities Level IIC
300
Percentage of CooperativeOverconventional Personalities Level IM
312
Level IIC
313
Percentage of ResponsibleHypernormal Personalities Level IM
322
THE AUTOCRATIC
323
Percentage of ManagerialAutocratic Personalities Level IM
330
CABLE PAGE
331

Seven Generic Areas of Personality
85
Interpersonal Interactions in Group Therapy
95
Percentage of Diagnostic Types Level IM
129
Categorization of CheckList Items
135
Illustrative SelfDiagnosis
139
Conscious Description of Mother
140
Conscious Description of Self and Family Members
141
Patients Description of Therapist
143
Therapists Description of Patient
144
Pattern of Familial Relations 14647
151
Percentage of Diagnostic Types Level IIC
152
Illustrative Classification of Interpersonal Behavior at the Symbolic or Projective Level
170
Diagnosis of Walter Mitty
174
Profile of TAT Scores
176
Conscious and Preconscious Profiles
178
Conflict Between Power and Weakness
179
Facade of Power and Responsibility
180
Rigidly Conventional Profiles
183
Depth Continuum of Personality Levels
187
Percentage of Diagnostic Types Level IIIT
190
SIGNIFICANT OMISSIONS
192
Rigid Avoidance of Rebelliousness
194
Consistent Omission of Rebellious Themes
196
THE EGO IDEAL
200
Docile Subject Idealizes Strength
204
A SYSTEM OF INTERPERSONAL DIAGNOSIS
207
Classification Profiles and Report
214
Summary Scores for Overconventional Patient
218
Diagnosis of FaÁade Behavior
219
The Adaptive and Maladaptive Interpersonal Diagnostic Types
220
Illustration of Interpersonal Diagnosis 22223
222
Diagnosis of Level III Behavior
224
Median Interpersonal SelfDescription Score for Six MMPI Clinical Groups
231
Operational Redefinition of Psychiatric Categories in Terms of Interpersonal Operations
233
CHAPTER PAGE
240
Part IV
248
Illustration of Multilevel Diagnosis 22627
250
Informal Listing of the Twelve Generic Variability Indices
252
Operational Definition of Fortyeight Indices of Variation 25456
254
Key to Numbers and Letters Employed in Coding Variability Indices
256
Calculation of Discrepancy Values
258
Horizontal Lov and Vertical Dom Values for Each Octant
260
Illustration of the Grouping of All Possible Discrepancies Involving the Diagnostic Codes 1 and 1
261
THEORY OF MULTILEVEL DIAGNOSIS
265
Percentage of RebelliousDistrustful Personalities Level IM
280
Percentage of RebelliousDistrustful Personalities Level IIC
281
Percentage of SelfEffacingMasochistic Personalities Level IM
290
Percentage of SelfEffacingMasochistic Personalities Level IIC
291
THE DEPENDENT
292
THE NARCISSISTIC
332
Percentage of CompetitiveNarcissistic Personalities Level IM
338
THE SADISTIC PERSONALITY
341
Part V
347
Percentage of AggressiveSadistic Personalities Level IM
349
INTERPERSONAL DIAGNOSIS OF HOSPITALIZED PSYCHOTICS
354
Level I Diagnoses Assigned to 148 Patients in the Three
356
Behavior of Ten Samples at Level I
380
The Significance of Differences Among Ten Symptomatic Groups
381
FIGURE PAGE 34 Behavior of Ten Samples at Level II
382
Behavior of Ten Samples at Level III
384
Multilevel Mean Scores of Normal Controls
387
Multilevel Mean Scores of Ulcer Patients
388
Multilevel Mean Scores of Hypertensive Patients
390
Multilevel Mean Scores of Obese Women
392
Overtly Neurotic Dermatitis Patients
394
SelfInflicted Dermatitis Patients
395
Unanxious Dermatitis Patients
397
Psychiatric Clinic Sample
398
Multilevel Mean Scores of Neurotics
399
Multilevel Mean Scores of Psychotics
401
ANALYSIS OF GROUP DYNAMICS IN AN INDUSTRIAL
403
SelfDescriptions of Four Executives
406
SelfDeception Indices of Four Executives
407
Perceptions by General Manager
418
Consensual Diagnosis of General Manager
420
Perceptions by Production Manager
421
Consensual Diagnosis of Production Manager
422
Perceptions by Personnel Manager
423
Consensual Diagnosis of Personnel Manager
424
PREDICTING AND MEASURING INTERPERSONAL DYNAMICS
426
Predictions of Interpersonal Roles
429
Measurements of Interpersonal Roles
430
Diagram of Five Measures of Personality 43233
432
ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE MEASUREMENT OF INTERPERSONAL
439
Two Contrasting MMPI Profiles
442
Illustrative Calculation of MMPI Indices for Measuring Symptomatic
443
The Level I Diagnosis
444
Summaries of Interpersonal Behavior
452
Illustration of the Calculations for Determining the Level I Profile
453
THE INTERPERSONAL ADJECTIVE CHECK List
455
TestRetest Correlations Form Illa by Octant and Sixteenth
461
THE ADMINISTRATION SCORING AND VALIDATION OF
464
Molar Rating Sheet
471
THE INTERPERSONAL DIAGNOSTIC REPORT
480
Multilevel Profile Before and After Psychotherapy
491
NORMS CONVERSION TABLES AND WEIGHTED SCORES USED
493
INDEX OF NAMES
501
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